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A GENDER-SPECIFIC PERSONALIZED NORMATIVE FEEDBACK APPROACH TO DECREASING ALCOHOL USE AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS

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Date Issued:
2007
Summary:
Feedback based on social normative information may be useful to decrease the misperceptions college students generally make about peer alcohol use. Gender-specific personalized normative feedback was used in the current study to determine if personalizing the normative feedback by gender would be more effective at decreasing the overestimations of other college students' drinking and self-reported drinking than feedback for the typical student for whom the gender is not specified. It was hypothesized that the participants who reported to drink 2-4 times a month or more and received gender-specific feedback would have larger decreases in perceptions of others' drinking and self-reported drinking than the nonspecific feedback and control groups. Analysis revealed that gender-specific feedback created a larger decrease in misperceptions than the control group but did not differ significantly from the nonspecific gender feedback group. Secondary analysis discusses the impact on the participants' stage of change in the Transtheortical Stages of Change Model over time and the positive correlations between number of drinks per episode and issues such as depression, anxiety, unplanned/unprotected sexual activity and engaging in other illegal activities. Strengths and limitations of the current research and suggestions for future harm reduction interventions are also addressed.
Title: A GENDER-SPECIFIC PERSONALIZED NORMATIVE FEEDBACK APPROACH TO DECREASING ALCOHOL USE AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS.
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Name(s): Lojewski, Renee Ann, Author
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2007
Publisher: University of West Florida
Language(s): English
Summary: Feedback based on social normative information may be useful to decrease the misperceptions college students generally make about peer alcohol use. Gender-specific personalized normative feedback was used in the current study to determine if personalizing the normative feedback by gender would be more effective at decreasing the overestimations of other college students' drinking and self-reported drinking than feedback for the typical student for whom the gender is not specified. It was hypothesized that the participants who reported to drink 2-4 times a month or more and received gender-specific feedback would have larger decreases in perceptions of others' drinking and self-reported drinking than the nonspecific feedback and control groups. Analysis revealed that gender-specific feedback created a larger decrease in misperceptions than the control group but did not differ significantly from the nonspecific gender feedback group. Secondary analysis discusses the impact on the participants' stage of change in the Transtheortical Stages of Change Model over time and the positive correlations between number of drinks per episode and issues such as depression, anxiety, unplanned/unprotected sexual activity and engaging in other illegal activities. Strengths and limitations of the current research and suggestions for future harm reduction interventions are also addressed.
Identifier: WFE0000080 (IID), uwf:60715 (fedora)
Note(s): M.A.
Department of Psychology
Masters
Subject(s): Alcohol use, normative feedback, college alcohol norms, alcohol interventions, social normative feedback
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000080
Restrictions on Access: public
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Host Institution: UWF

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