You are here

AN EGALITARIAN HONORS PROGRAM: THE LIVED EXPERIENCES OF RURAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENTS

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
This qualitative research study examined the lived experiences of students at a community college that has implemented an open-enrollment honors program. I surveyed high achievers who opted not to participate as well as a variety of students who had enrolled so that I could explore issues of self-efficacy in students' enrollment decisions. In addition, to understand the meaning of the program to its participants I conducted two in-depth interviews with program participants, facilitated a focus group with honors graduates, and recorded direct observations of the program in its first two years of operation. The narratives and other data generated during this study suggest that students enjoy the program and believe it is beneficial to them, which may increase engagement. In addition, it seems that because many students have not defined themselves as capable of success in an honors program, they may lack the self-efficacy required for voluntary enrollment. Their comments imply that individual encouragement from an instructor who provides accurate information about the "no-risk aspects of the program increases the likelihood that a student will participate.
Title: AN EGALITARIAN HONORS PROGRAM: THE LIVED EXPERIENCES OF RURAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENTS.
35 views
25 downloads
Name(s): McMillan, Barbara Ferguson, Author
Rogers, Mary F., Committee Chair
Pilcher, Janet, Committee Member
Nichols, Joyce, Committee Member
University of West Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of West Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This qualitative research study examined the lived experiences of students at a community college that has implemented an open-enrollment honors program. I surveyed high achievers who opted not to participate as well as a variety of students who had enrolled so that I could explore issues of self-efficacy in students' enrollment decisions. In addition, to understand the meaning of the program to its participants I conducted two in-depth interviews with program participants, facilitated a focus group with honors graduates, and recorded direct observations of the program in its first two years of operation. The narratives and other data generated during this study suggest that students enjoy the program and believe it is beneficial to them, which may increase engagement. In addition, it seems that because many students have not defined themselves as capable of success in an honors program, they may lack the self-efficacy required for voluntary enrollment. Their comments imply that individual encouragement from an instructor who provides accurate information about the "no-risk aspects of the program increases the likelihood that a student will participate.
Identifier: WFE0000125 (IID), uwf:60792 (fedora)
Note(s): Ed.D.
Department of Graduate Education
Doctorate
Subject(s): Community college, honors program
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000125
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UWF

In Collections