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AN EXCERPT FROM APOCALYTOPIA

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Date Issued:
2016
Summary:
This thesis is an excerpt from a full-length frame narrative that I intend to call Apocalytopia. In this frame narrative modeled after The Canterbury Tales, a group of survivors traveling to a safe haven after a global catastrophe pass their time on the road by telling stories about their new world. The excerpt submitted here begins with a former photographer telling a story about a lone survivor's struggle to cope with solitude. The questions his tale raises about the nature of loneliness, wonder, and the definition of community initiate a conversation between some of his companions, whose subsequent banter and storytelling not only presents three starkly different depictions of human interaction, but questions the travelers' own sense of community and the nature of storytelling as well. These layers of interpretation are a hallmark of frame narratives, and the goal of this thesis is to suggest that each traveler's role as both a character and a storyteller is analogous to real authors' participation in the evolution of literature and the diversity of literary styles.
Title: AN EXCERPT FROM APOCALYTOPIA.
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Name(s): Angeletti, Eric Joseph, Author
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: University of West Florida
Language(s): English
Summary: This thesis is an excerpt from a full-length frame narrative that I intend to call Apocalytopia. In this frame narrative modeled after The Canterbury Tales, a group of survivors traveling to a safe haven after a global catastrophe pass their time on the road by telling stories about their new world. The excerpt submitted here begins with a former photographer telling a story about a lone survivor's struggle to cope with solitude. The questions his tale raises about the nature of loneliness, wonder, and the definition of community initiate a conversation between some of his companions, whose subsequent banter and storytelling not only presents three starkly different depictions of human interaction, but questions the travelers' own sense of community and the nature of storytelling as well. These layers of interpretation are a hallmark of frame narratives, and the goal of this thesis is to suggest that each traveler's role as both a character and a storyteller is analogous to real authors' participation in the evolution of literature and the diversity of literary styles.
Identifier: WFE0000550 (IID), uwf:61242 (fedora)
Note(s): 2016-12-01
M.A.
Department of English
Masters
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000550
Restrictions on Access: public
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Host Institution: UWF

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