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BACTERIOPLANKTON COMMUNITY RESPONSE TO SOLAR RADIATION AND CRUDE OIL IN THE NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

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Date Issued:
2015
Summary:
Bacterioplankton are vital to cycling nutrients in marine ecosystems. Small surface area to volume ratios makes bacteria efficient at accessing low concentrations of nutrients yet also makes them vulnerable to damage from ultraviolet radiation (UVR). In addition to direct damage, solar radiation can also phototransform pollutants, like crude oil, potentially increasing toxicity. Despite this, many studies examining the effects of oil on bacterial communities have not included the impacts of phototransformed oil. This research used microcosm experiments to examine shifts in bacterial communities in response to solar radiation and the combined effects of solar radiation and crude oil in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Analysis of inoculum communities suggests that water column structure influences community similarity. Analysis suggests that UVB decreases bacterial diversity and in these treatments both Alteromonas and Shimia had an increased presence. Bacterial response to crude oil and solar radiation was complex, and in April, samples had very low diversity and were dominated by Alteromonas, while in September diversity of treatments was higher with the exception of oil full sun and oil PAR where Shimia dominated other taxa. Overall, bacterial response to both solar radiation and crude oil were dependent initial environmental conditions.
Title: BACTERIOPLANKTON COMMUNITY RESPONSE TO SOLAR RADIATION AND CRUDE OIL IN THE NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO.
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Name(s): Hutcheson, Josette Marjorie, Author
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of West Florida
Language(s): English
Summary: Bacterioplankton are vital to cycling nutrients in marine ecosystems. Small surface area to volume ratios makes bacteria efficient at accessing low concentrations of nutrients yet also makes them vulnerable to damage from ultraviolet radiation (UVR). In addition to direct damage, solar radiation can also phototransform pollutants, like crude oil, potentially increasing toxicity. Despite this, many studies examining the effects of oil on bacterial communities have not included the impacts of phototransformed oil. This research used microcosm experiments to examine shifts in bacterial communities in response to solar radiation and the combined effects of solar radiation and crude oil in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Analysis of inoculum communities suggests that water column structure influences community similarity. Analysis suggests that UVB decreases bacterial diversity and in these treatments both Alteromonas and Shimia had an increased presence. Bacterial response to crude oil and solar radiation was complex, and in April, samples had very low diversity and were dominated by Alteromonas, while in September diversity of treatments was higher with the exception of oil full sun and oil PAR where Shimia dominated other taxa. Overall, bacterial response to both solar radiation and crude oil were dependent initial environmental conditions.
Identifier: WFE0000503 (IID), uwf:61260 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-06-01
M.S.
Department of Biology
Masters
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000503
Restrictions on Access: public
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Host Institution: UWF

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