You are here

Beyond the guacamole

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2021
Abstract:
The avocado has picked up several nicknames, but its most recent is "Green Gold." The avocado has blossomed into a multi-billion-dollar-a-year industry, with 77 percent of the world's avocados imported into the United States. From avocado toast to Superbowl guacamole, Americans hunger for the fruit labeled a superfood. After President Bill Clinton signed NAFTA, the border was open to avocados from Mexico. The Mexican state of Michoacán was the only state permitted to ship to the United States because they met all the required sanitary conditions. The booming avocado business increased the Michoacán farmer's profit from two and a half pesos per kilo to eighty pesos. Not surprisingly, the increased revenue attracted a growing workforce. It also drew the attention of local drug cartels. But why would a successful drug cartel need to encroach into other markets? The short answer is that cartel involvement in the avocado industry is an unintended consequence of the fight against drugs. The avocado has become a cash crop for both legal and illegal markets.
Title: Beyond the guacamole: a history of how drug organizations became involved in the avocado industry.
30 views
3 downloads
Name(s): Rudo, Jessica Lynne, author.
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Bibliography
Text-txt
Academic Theses.
Academic Theses.
Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation.
Issuance: monographic
Date Created: 2021
Date Issued: 2021
Other Date: 2021.
Publisher: University of West Florida,
Place of Publication: Pensacola, Florida :
Physical Form: electronic resource
Extent: 1 online resource (v, 84 leaves : illustrations)
Language(s): eng
Abstract: The avocado has picked up several nicknames, but its most recent is "Green Gold." The avocado has blossomed into a multi-billion-dollar-a-year industry, with 77 percent of the world's avocados imported into the United States. From avocado toast to Superbowl guacamole, Americans hunger for the fruit labeled a superfood. After President Bill Clinton signed NAFTA, the border was open to avocados from Mexico. The Mexican state of Michoacán was the only state permitted to ship to the United States because they met all the required sanitary conditions. The booming avocado business increased the Michoacán farmer's profit from two and a half pesos per kilo to eighty pesos. Not surprisingly, the increased revenue attracted a growing workforce. It also drew the attention of local drug cartels. But why would a successful drug cartel need to encroach into other markets? The short answer is that cartel involvement in the avocado industry is an unintended consequence of the fight against drugs. The avocado has become a cash crop for both legal and illegal markets.
Identifier: 1293881200 (oclc), WFE0000762 (IID)
Note(s): by Jessica Lynne Rudo.
Department of History, College of Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities
Thesis (M.A.) University of West Florida 2021
Includes bibliographical references.
Also available in print.
Subject(s): University of West Florida.
Avocado industry
Cartels -- Mexico
Avocado industry
Cartels
Mexico
Avocadoes, cartels, United States policy
Library Classification: LD1807.F62k 2021 R83
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000762
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Host Institution: UWF
Other Format: Beyond the guacamole. (Print version:)
(OCoLC)1293881154

In Collections