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Characterizing the effects of atypical antipsychotics on the neutrophil model cell line, PLB-985

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Abstract:
Atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) are a class of drug used to treat several mental diseases like bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia. However, these substances are also known to cause a rare, yet severe and sometimes fatal syndrome known as neutropenia. Neutropenia (and its more acute form, agranulocytosis) is characterized by a significant decrease in an individual's circulating neutrophils--the most abundant white blood cell. Neutrophils are essential for proper innate immunity, and depletion can result in higher risk of developing life-threatening illnesses. How atypical antipsychotics induce neutropenia is not well-understood, though research is ongoing. In this study, we aim to characterize the effects of four AAPs--clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine and aripiprazole--on PLB-985 cell viability, as assessed by the XTT Cell Viability Assay. We found that only aripiprazole is able to significantly decrease dPLB-985 cell viability after 48-hour treatment. We hypothesized that aripiprazole's negative effect on cell viability is through its unique mechanism of action as a partial dopamine agonist; however, our results suggest that aripiprazole's effects are independent of dopamine receptor agonism.
Title: Characterizing the effects of atypical antipsychotics on the neutrophil model cell line, PLB-985.
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Name(s): Robbs, Emily J., author.
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Bibliography
Text-txt
Academic Theses.
Academic Theses.
Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation.
Issuance: monographic
Date Created: 2021
Other Date: 2021.
Publisher: University of West Florida,
Place of Publication: [Pensacola, Florida] :
Physical Form: electronic resource
Extent: 1 online resource (vi, 34 leaves : illustrations)
Language(s): eng
Abstract: Atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) are a class of drug used to treat several mental diseases like bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia. However, these substances are also known to cause a rare, yet severe and sometimes fatal syndrome known as neutropenia. Neutropenia (and its more acute form, agranulocytosis) is characterized by a significant decrease in an individual's circulating neutrophils--the most abundant white blood cell. Neutrophils are essential for proper innate immunity, and depletion can result in higher risk of developing life-threatening illnesses. How atypical antipsychotics induce neutropenia is not well-understood, though research is ongoing. In this study, we aim to characterize the effects of four AAPs--clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine and aripiprazole--on PLB-985 cell viability, as assessed by the XTT Cell Viability Assay. We found that only aripiprazole is able to significantly decrease dPLB-985 cell viability after 48-hour treatment. We hypothesized that aripiprazole's negative effect on cell viability is through its unique mechanism of action as a partial dopamine agonist; however, our results suggest that aripiprazole's effects are independent of dopamine receptor agonism.
Identifier: 1294639220 (oclc), WFE0000774 (IID)
Note(s): by Emily J. Robbs.
Department of Biology, Hal Marcus College of Science and Engineering
Thesis (M.S.) University of West Florida 2021
Includes bibliographical references.
Also available in print.
Subject(s): University of West Florida
University of West Florida.
Antipsychotic drugs -- Research
Agranulocytosis, aripiprazole, clozapine, neutrophil, PLB-985
Library Classification: LD1807.F62k 2021 R63
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000774
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Host Institution: UWF
Other Format: Characterizing the effects of atypical antipsychotics on the neutrophil model cell line, PLB-985. (Print version:)
(OCoLC)1294628169

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