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Can delivery modality influence test performance?

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Date Issued:
2020
Abstract:
This paper presents a mixed group experimental design to examine whether how students take a test within the classroom affects exam performance and test delivery preferences. In this study, I randomly assigned 35 students in a social psychology course to take their first exam in either a paper-based format or an online mode in the same context. Students switched to the alternative format for their second exam. I measured average exam scores, speed of completion, attitudes towards computer testing, testing anxiety, and modality preference. As predicted, the testing format made no difference in mean test performance on each exam. There also was no majority preference for one modality over the other when given a choice of how students wanted to take the final exam in the class. Format preference was unrelated to testing anxiety or exam performance. However, attitudes towards computer-based testing appear to correlate with modality preference. Therefore, online-based testing modalities do not appear to have any significant disadvantages when compared to paper-based formats and can possibly serve as a convenient, resource saving alternative.
Title: Can delivery modality influence test performance?: comparing traditional and digital formats.
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Name(s): Moyer, Gage H., author.
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Bibliography
Text-txt
Academic Theses.
Academic Theses.
Electronic Thesis Or Dissertation.
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2020
Date Issued: 2020
Other Date: 2020.
Publisher: University of West Florida,
Place of Publication: Pensacola, Florida :
Physical Form: electronic resource
Extent: 1 online resource (iv, 37 leaves)
Language(s): eng
Abstract: This paper presents a mixed group experimental design to examine whether how students take a test within the classroom affects exam performance and test delivery preferences. In this study, I randomly assigned 35 students in a social psychology course to take their first exam in either a paper-based format or an online mode in the same context. Students switched to the alternative format for their second exam. I measured average exam scores, speed of completion, attitudes towards computer testing, testing anxiety, and modality preference. As predicted, the testing format made no difference in mean test performance on each exam. There also was no majority preference for one modality over the other when given a choice of how students wanted to take the final exam in the class. Format preference was unrelated to testing anxiety or exam performance. However, attitudes towards computer-based testing appear to correlate with modality preference. Therefore, online-based testing modalities do not appear to have any significant disadvantages when compared to paper-based formats and can possibly serve as a convenient, resource saving alternative.
Identifier: 1202267393 (oclc), WFE0000723 (IID)
Note(s): by Gage H. Moyer.
Department of Psychology, Usha Kundu, MD College of Health.
Thesis (M.A.) University of West Florida 2020
Includes bibliographical references.
Also available in print.
Subject(s): University of West Florida
University of West Florida.
Psychology, Experimental
Library Classification: LD1807.F62k 2020 M694
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000723
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Host Institution: UWF
Other Format: Can delivery modality influence test performance? : comparing traditional and digital formats. (Print version:)
(OCoLC)1202267394

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