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AN EXAMINATION OF FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE CAREER DECISION-MAKING CERTAINTY IN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

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Date Issued:
2009
Summary:
A mixed methods ex post facto study was used to examine intrinsic and extrinsic influences on the degree of certainty students felt in their career decision-making processes. The study was conducted in a high school located in the Southeastern United States wherein 242 girls and 238 boys in grades 9 through 12 participated. The theoretical framework of this study consisted of (a) a theory of vocational personalities and work environments, (b) a theory of vocational interest and vocational choice, (c), a theory of self-efficacy (d) and a theory of cognitive information processing. Two commercial instruments were used to investigate the research questions. The independent factors used to predict the dependent variable of Career Decision-Making Certainty were (a) Decision-Making Confusion, (b) Commitment Anxiety, (c) External Conflict, and (d) Career Indecision. Statistical analyses indicated Decision-Making Confusion and Career Indecision had negative influences on Career Decision-Making Certainty whereas External Conflict had a positive influence; Commitment Anxiety was not a significant predictor. An investigation of predictors by gender, grade level, and ethnicity indicated girls had higher levels of Decision-Making Confusion and Commitment Anxiety than boys. An analysis of students' Total Decision-Making Negative Career Thoughts indicated girls had higher levels of Career Decision-Making Negative Career Thoughts than boys. Content theme analysis revealed students' perceptions of positive and negative influences on their levels of certainty in their career decision-making processes. Four themes of positive influences emerged: (a) support from parents and friends (b) interest, (c) self-confidence, and (d) job experience. Four themes of negative influences emerged: (a) career indecision, (b) do not know how to get there, (c) lack of self-confidence, and (d) lack of knowledge about careers. In general, Decision-Making Confusion and Career Indecision exhibited negative influences on Career Decision-Making Certainty whereas External Conflict exhibited positive influence; Commitment Anxiety was not a significant influence. Post hoc comparisons revealed students did not vary by grade level or ethnicity on the dependent or independent variables but some variances were found by gender.
Title: AN EXAMINATION OF FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE CAREER DECISION-MAKING CERTAINTY IN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS.
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Name(s): Barrow, Clark Eugene, Author
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2009
Publisher: University of West Florida
Language(s): English
Summary: A mixed methods ex post facto study was used to examine intrinsic and extrinsic influences on the degree of certainty students felt in their career decision-making processes. The study was conducted in a high school located in the Southeastern United States wherein 242 girls and 238 boys in grades 9 through 12 participated. The theoretical framework of this study consisted of (a) a theory of vocational personalities and work environments, (b) a theory of vocational interest and vocational choice, (c), a theory of self-efficacy (d) and a theory of cognitive information processing. Two commercial instruments were used to investigate the research questions. The independent factors used to predict the dependent variable of Career Decision-Making Certainty were (a) Decision-Making Confusion, (b) Commitment Anxiety, (c) External Conflict, and (d) Career Indecision. Statistical analyses indicated Decision-Making Confusion and Career Indecision had negative influences on Career Decision-Making Certainty whereas External Conflict had a positive influence; Commitment Anxiety was not a significant predictor. An investigation of predictors by gender, grade level, and ethnicity indicated girls had higher levels of Decision-Making Confusion and Commitment Anxiety than boys. An analysis of students' Total Decision-Making Negative Career Thoughts indicated girls had higher levels of Career Decision-Making Negative Career Thoughts than boys. Content theme analysis revealed students' perceptions of positive and negative influences on their levels of certainty in their career decision-making processes. Four themes of positive influences emerged: (a) support from parents and friends (b) interest, (c) self-confidence, and (d) job experience. Four themes of negative influences emerged: (a) career indecision, (b) do not know how to get there, (c) lack of self-confidence, and (d) lack of knowledge about careers. In general, Decision-Making Confusion and Career Indecision exhibited negative influences on Career Decision-Making Certainty whereas External Conflict exhibited positive influence; Commitment Anxiety was not a significant influence. Post hoc comparisons revealed students did not vary by grade level or ethnicity on the dependent or independent variables but some variances were found by gender.
Identifier: WFE0000171 (IID), uwf:60780 (fedora)
Note(s): Ed.D.
Department of Education
Doctorate
Subject(s): Career choice, ex post facto, mixed methods, high school students, career indecision, career decision-making
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000171
Restrictions on Access: campus 2011-01-01
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Host Institution: UWF

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