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AN INVESTIGATION OF UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS' PERCEPTIONS OF ONLINE INTERACTION

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Date Issued:
2008
Summary:
In this study, undergraduate and graduate students’ perceptions of online interaction, and reasons students choose to take online courses were investigated. The results of this study indicated that students perceive online learning as a key element for their success and persistence in online learning. There was a significant difference between undergraduate and graduate students’ perceptions of content interaction. Whereas more graduate students reported that they enjoy courses that are partially individualized with some instructor direction, undergraduate students reported that they enjoy innovative content interaction strategies. There were no significant differences among conversation and collaboration, intrapersonal/metacognitive, and support interactions. Both groups of students identified timely feedback from the instructor and monitoring of one’s own progress as important factors in learning online. In addition, the majority of students reported that they take online courses for convenience and flexibility, and over 50% of students indicated that they could not attend school if courses were not online.
Title: AN INVESTIGATION OF UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS' PERCEPTIONS OF ONLINE INTERACTION.
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Name(s): Kim, Myong Sun, Author
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of West Florida
Language(s): English
Summary: In this study, undergraduate and graduate students’ perceptions of online interaction, and reasons students choose to take online courses were investigated. The results of this study indicated that students perceive online learning as a key element for their success and persistence in online learning. There was a significant difference between undergraduate and graduate students’ perceptions of content interaction. Whereas more graduate students reported that they enjoy courses that are partially individualized with some instructor direction, undergraduate students reported that they enjoy innovative content interaction strategies. There were no significant differences among conversation and collaboration, intrapersonal/metacognitive, and support interactions. Both groups of students identified timely feedback from the instructor and monitoring of one’s own progress as important factors in learning online. In addition, the majority of students reported that they take online courses for convenience and flexibility, and over 50% of students indicated that they could not attend school if courses were not online.
Identifier: WFE0000113 (IID), uwf:60841 (fedora)
Note(s): Ed.D.
Department of Instructional and Performance Technology
Doctorate
Subject(s): Attrition in distance learning, online learning, adult learners, interaction, online learners
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000113
Restrictions on Access: campus 2010-05-01
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Host Institution: UWF

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