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A MACRO- AND MICROSCOPIC ZOOARCHAEOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF LIVING CONDITIONS ABOARD THE EMANUEL POINT WRECKS

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Date Issued:
2011
Summary:
In 1559 an effort was made to establish a colony in what is now Pensacola, Florida. Led by Don Tristan de Luna, the expedition met with an untimely fate and many of the vessels were lost in Pensacola Bay. The first of what are known as the Emanuel Point Shipwrecks was discovered and excavated in the mid 1990s. The second was located in 2006 and excavations are ongoing. In an effort to examine the shortcomings of current underwater archaeological methodology, sediment samples were collected from various locations during the excavation of the second Emanuel Point ship. Examined exclusively through the use of a microscope, these samples led to a largely un-analyzed data set within maritime archaeology: insects. Combined with other macro-and microscopic zooarchaeological material from both Emanuel Point ships, this data led to an examination of the living conditions aboard the two vessels, and the impact that various animals had on the daily life of the sailors and passengers in the sixteenth-century.
Title: A MACRO- AND MICROSCOPIC ZOOARCHAEOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF LIVING CONDITIONS ABOARD THE EMANUEL POINT WRECKS.
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Name(s): Shidner, Jacob Daniel, Author
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of West Florida
Language(s): English
Summary: In 1559 an effort was made to establish a colony in what is now Pensacola, Florida. Led by Don Tristan de Luna, the expedition met with an untimely fate and many of the vessels were lost in Pensacola Bay. The first of what are known as the Emanuel Point Shipwrecks was discovered and excavated in the mid 1990s. The second was located in 2006 and excavations are ongoing. In an effort to examine the shortcomings of current underwater archaeological methodology, sediment samples were collected from various locations during the excavation of the second Emanuel Point ship. Examined exclusively through the use of a microscope, these samples led to a largely un-analyzed data set within maritime archaeology: insects. Combined with other macro-and microscopic zooarchaeological material from both Emanuel Point ships, this data led to an examination of the living conditions aboard the two vessels, and the impact that various animals had on the daily life of the sailors and passengers in the sixteenth-century.
Identifier: WFE0000288 (IID), uwf:60972 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-12-01
M.A.
Department of Anthropology
Masters
Subject(s): Archaeology, shipwreck, zooarchaeology, insects, hygiene, animals
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000288
Restrictions on Access: public
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Host Institution: UWF

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