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ASSESSING ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS' INTENTIONS TO TEACH NUTRITION: AN APPLICATION OF THE THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR

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Date Issued:
2013
Summary:
The purpose of this study was to apply the theory of planned behavior (TpB; Ajzen, 1985, 1991) to describe factors that influence physical education teachers' intentions to teach nutrition as part of their physical education curricula. An instrument (Teaching Nutrition in Physical Education Survey [TNPES]) was developed following the guidelines established by Fishbein and Ajzen (2010) to measure all variables of the TpB. Two pilot studies were conducted to establish the reliability of the TNPES items based on internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha and to determine validity of the TNPES using principal component analysis, a content analysis by experts, and a test of concurrent validity. Temporal stability of the belief-based measures of the TNPES was also established using the test-retest method. Cronbach's alpha, based on the results of the second pilot study, was .906 for the direct measures of attitude toward the behavior, .705 for subjective norm, and .917 for perceived behavioral control. Pearson correlation coefficients for the test-retest reliability analysis of the belief-based measures were as follows: behavioral beliefs (r = .532), normative beliefs (r = .845), and control beliefs (r = .898). The TNPES was administered to a sample of elementary physical education teachers who were working in six school districts in the state of Florida (N = 106). The results revealed that the participants had quite strong intentions to teach nutrition as part of their physical education curricula. A multiple regression analysis resulted in significant regression equation, F(3, 102) = 15.013, p < .001). Collectively, the constructs of the TpB explained 30.6% of the variance in participants' intentions to teach nutrition. However, the beta weights from the regression equation showed that only subjective norms were a significant predictor of behavioral intention. The analysis of the belief-based measures indicated that participants' intentions to teach nutrition were influenced by (a) significant others (e.g., school administrators, principals, other physical education teachers), (b) the amount of nutrition training they received, (c) the amount of class time they believed they would have to teach nutrition, and (d) beliefs about the availability of resources, materials, and support in the workplace.
Title: ASSESSING ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS' INTENTIONS TO TEACH NUTRITION: AN APPLICATION OF THE THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR.
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Name(s): Green, Heather Lynn, Author
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of West Florida
Language(s): English
Summary: The purpose of this study was to apply the theory of planned behavior (TpB; Ajzen, 1985, 1991) to describe factors that influence physical education teachers' intentions to teach nutrition as part of their physical education curricula. An instrument (Teaching Nutrition in Physical Education Survey [TNPES]) was developed following the guidelines established by Fishbein and Ajzen (2010) to measure all variables of the TpB. Two pilot studies were conducted to establish the reliability of the TNPES items based on internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha and to determine validity of the TNPES using principal component analysis, a content analysis by experts, and a test of concurrent validity. Temporal stability of the belief-based measures of the TNPES was also established using the test-retest method. Cronbach's alpha, based on the results of the second pilot study, was .906 for the direct measures of attitude toward the behavior, .705 for subjective norm, and .917 for perceived behavioral control. Pearson correlation coefficients for the test-retest reliability analysis of the belief-based measures were as follows: behavioral beliefs (r = .532), normative beliefs (r = .845), and control beliefs (r = .898). The TNPES was administered to a sample of elementary physical education teachers who were working in six school districts in the state of Florida (N = 106). The results revealed that the participants had quite strong intentions to teach nutrition as part of their physical education curricula. A multiple regression analysis resulted in significant regression equation, F(3, 102) = 15.013, p < .001). Collectively, the constructs of the TpB explained 30.6% of the variance in participants' intentions to teach nutrition. However, the beta weights from the regression equation showed that only subjective norms were a significant predictor of behavioral intention. The analysis of the belief-based measures indicated that participants' intentions to teach nutrition were influenced by (a) significant others (e.g., school administrators, principals, other physical education teachers), (b) the amount of nutrition training they received, (c) the amount of class time they believed they would have to teach nutrition, and (d) beliefs about the availability of resources, materials, and support in the workplace.
Identifier: WFE0000388 (IID), uwf:61063 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-06-01
Ed.D.
Department of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science
Doctorate
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000388
Restrictions on Access: public
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Host Institution: UWF

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