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A COMPARISON OF TWO VIRTUAL COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES IN STUDENT SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT TEAMS

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Date Issued:
2014
Summary:
Increasing transportation costs have led software development organizations to seek ways to allow individuals in different locations to work together without traveling. Virtual technology has been one proposed way, though there has been some debate over the type of technology that will maximize team performance and social development. A conceptual model was developed which predicts how the combined influence of team diversity, technology use, social presence and sociability affect intervening psychological states that, in turn, affect team processes and outcomes. In addition to conducting an initial test of the model, this study was conducted to assess the effects of two virtual technologies on 15 3-person teams completing an undergraduate software engineering project. Teams were randomly assigned to communicate either via videoconferencing or virtual worlds technology. Results suggest virtual world teams were able to perform equivalently to videoconferencing teams, but virtual world members were more likely to report negative experiences such as conflict and less likely to report positive experiences such as coordination. This study supports that student teams working in a virtual world environment perform as well as teams meeting in more traditional distributed media. This study also suggests that the model shows promise, though further research is needed.
Title: A COMPARISON OF TWO VIRTUAL COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES IN STUDENT SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT TEAMS.
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Name(s): Manning, Kelly Jennifer, Author
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: University of West Florida
Language(s): English
Summary: Increasing transportation costs have led software development organizations to seek ways to allow individuals in different locations to work together without traveling. Virtual technology has been one proposed way, though there has been some debate over the type of technology that will maximize team performance and social development. A conceptual model was developed which predicts how the combined influence of team diversity, technology use, social presence and sociability affect intervening psychological states that, in turn, affect team processes and outcomes. In addition to conducting an initial test of the model, this study was conducted to assess the effects of two virtual technologies on 15 3-person teams completing an undergraduate software engineering project. Teams were randomly assigned to communicate either via videoconferencing or virtual worlds technology. Results suggest virtual world teams were able to perform equivalently to videoconferencing teams, but virtual world members were more likely to report negative experiences such as conflict and less likely to report positive experiences such as coordination. This study supports that student teams working in a virtual world environment perform as well as teams meeting in more traditional distributed media. This study also suggests that the model shows promise, though further research is needed.
Identifier: WFE0000447 (IID), uwf:61082 (fedora)
Note(s): 2014-06-01
M.A.
Department of Psychological and Behavioral Sciences
Masters
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000447
Restrictions on Access: public
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Host Institution: UWF

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