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ENGAGEMENT OF CHILDREN ON THE AUTISM SPECTRUM: ATTENDING TO INFORMATION DELIVERED VIA SINGING VERSUS SPEAKING

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Date Issued:
2016
Summary:
Characteristically, children on the autism spectrum do not inherently attend and respond to speech as do children not on the autism spectrum. This study included the systematic, controlled collection and analysis of quantitative data in order to explore whether adding a musical dimension could facilitate the provision of instruction that may be incorporated into educational approaches. Building on aspects of the social motivation theory of autism, this study addressed whether children on the autism spectrum are more responsive to messages delivered through or with music than to speech. Results indicated that the attention level/engagement of some children on the autism spectrum increases when information is presented via singing rather than speaking, partly depending on how attention level/engagement is defined and measured. Whereas a majority of this study's participants did not display a higher level of visual attending in the singing condition, a majority of them displayed a higher level of correct response in the singing condition, signifying an increase in auditory attending. Results also indicated that the attention level/engagement of children on the autism spectrum differ based on the complexity of the music, with a higher level displayed within the complex music condition. A majority of this study's participants displayed a higher level of both visual attending and correct response in the complex music condition. An implication of this study's findings is that educators and other professionals who work with children on the autism spectrum should be aware that the addition of music may be an effective stimulus to gain attention level/engagement. Another implication is that the use of more complex music may provide a pronounced benefit.
Title: ENGAGEMENT OF CHILDREN ON THE AUTISM SPECTRUM: ATTENDING TO INFORMATION DELIVERED VIA SINGING VERSUS SPEAKING.
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Name(s): Quinn, Carla Fay, Author
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: University of West Florida
Language(s): English
Summary: Characteristically, children on the autism spectrum do not inherently attend and respond to speech as do children not on the autism spectrum. This study included the systematic, controlled collection and analysis of quantitative data in order to explore whether adding a musical dimension could facilitate the provision of instruction that may be incorporated into educational approaches. Building on aspects of the social motivation theory of autism, this study addressed whether children on the autism spectrum are more responsive to messages delivered through or with music than to speech. Results indicated that the attention level/engagement of some children on the autism spectrum increases when information is presented via singing rather than speaking, partly depending on how attention level/engagement is defined and measured. Whereas a majority of this study's participants did not display a higher level of visual attending in the singing condition, a majority of them displayed a higher level of correct response in the singing condition, signifying an increase in auditory attending. Results also indicated that the attention level/engagement of children on the autism spectrum differ based on the complexity of the music, with a higher level displayed within the complex music condition. A majority of this study's participants displayed a higher level of both visual attending and correct response in the complex music condition. An implication of this study's findings is that educators and other professionals who work with children on the autism spectrum should be aware that the addition of music may be an effective stimulus to gain attention level/engagement. Another implication is that the use of more complex music may provide a pronounced benefit.
Identifier: WFE0000546 (IID), uwf:61227 (fedora)
Note(s): 2016-06-01
Ed.D.
Department of Teacher Education
Doctorate
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000546
Restrictions on Access: public
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Host Institution: UWF

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