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AN ANALYSIS OF BANDURA'S THEORY OF SELF-EFFICACY AS IT RELATES TO UNIVERSITY FACULTY MEMBERS' INTENT TO USE SYNCHRONOUS TECHNOLOGY IN ONLINE CLASSES BY USING THE INNOVATION DIFFUSION PROCESS

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Date Issued:
2016
Summary:
The purpose of this quantitative study was to analyze relationships between instructors' self-efficacy and their intent to use synchronous technology in online environments. Both traditional, brick-and-mortar universities as well as for-profit, fully online universities might benefit from this research study because this study is about the adoption of technology innovations. Recent trends indicated that more technological innovations led to the development of higher-speed computers with larger-capacity hard drives. In turn, high-speed computers with large storage capacities allowed online colleges to offer education to remote students. Both online and traditional universities have developed ways to recruit and retain students. Many universities now incorporate audio, video, and picture illustrations into their online courses in order to keep the course materials up-to-date and attractive to students. Not all universities, however, conduct research to determine the best strategies to motivate instructors to use technologies to teach online courses. This ex post facto research focused on factors that might influence university faculty members' perceptions regarding the use of synchronous technology in teaching online classes. The results of the study could not confirm the correlation because the study violated assumptions of Pearson's correction r. However, the research added to the current literature in online learning.
Title: AN ANALYSIS OF BANDURA'S THEORY OF SELF-EFFICACY AS IT RELATES TO UNIVERSITY FACULTY MEMBERS' INTENT TO USE SYNCHRONOUS TECHNOLOGY IN ONLINE CLASSES BY USING THE INNOVATION DIFFUSION PROCESS.
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Name(s): Islam, Mofidul, Author
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: University of West Florida
Language(s): English
Summary: The purpose of this quantitative study was to analyze relationships between instructors' self-efficacy and their intent to use synchronous technology in online environments. Both traditional, brick-and-mortar universities as well as for-profit, fully online universities might benefit from this research study because this study is about the adoption of technology innovations. Recent trends indicated that more technological innovations led to the development of higher-speed computers with larger-capacity hard drives. In turn, high-speed computers with large storage capacities allowed online colleges to offer education to remote students. Both online and traditional universities have developed ways to recruit and retain students. Many universities now incorporate audio, video, and picture illustrations into their online courses in order to keep the course materials up-to-date and attractive to students. Not all universities, however, conduct research to determine the best strategies to motivate instructors to use technologies to teach online courses. This ex post facto research focused on factors that might influence university faculty members' perceptions regarding the use of synchronous technology in teaching online classes. The results of the study could not confirm the correlation because the study violated assumptions of Pearson's correction r. However, the research added to the current literature in online learning.
Identifier: WFE0000541 (IID), uwf:61239 (fedora)
Note(s): 2016-06-01
Ed.D.
Department of Instructional, Workforce and Applied Technology
Doctorate
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000541
Restrictions on Access: public
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Host Institution: UWF

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