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Stuck in Stockholm

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Date Issued:
2021.
Abstract:
The researcher investigated whether personality type and learning style predicted performance in distance education. Thirty-four participants from 3 sections of Art Humanities completed online the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and the Learning Styles Inventory. Using regression analysis, it was determined that neither personality type nor learning style had a statistically significant effect on student performance in this setting. However, the data did reveal some apparent self-selection of the learning environment. Sensors outrepresented Intuitives by a large scale, identifying further areas for research. A binomial test was used to prove these results were not random. As some scholars have noted, COVID-19 has exacerbated existing inequities and economic insecurities that increase the risk of harassment. Sexual harassment (SH) involves conduct of a sexual nature that creates an intimidating or hostile work environment or interferes with an individual's job performance. This speculated increase in SH due to COVID-19 could relate to an increase in Stockholm syndrome (SS) among essential workers, as many essential workers may stay at their workplace due to benefits (e.g., finances, healthcare) despite having experienced abuse. As such, the current study applies Stockholm syndrome as a framework to examine the potential relationship between SH and SS, and the effects that various factors (e.g., essential worker status, source of harassment) have on this relationship. One-hundred and twelve participants completed online surveys using Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk). Analyses revealed a positive relationship between SH and SS. Furthermore, essential workers reported higher levels of both SH and SS than their non-essential counterparts. This thesis bridges the gap between SH and domestic violence literature, such that it is the first to apply the SS framework to workplace instances of SH. Future research calls for examining the influence of race and power in influencing this relationship, as well as examining the long-term effects of feelings of SS in the workplace.
Title: Stuck in Stockholm: examining sexual harassment and COVID-19 related factors as predictors of Stockholm Syndrome in the workplace.
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Name(s): Hurley, Kenzie Joy, author.
University of West Florida Department of Psychology.
University of West Florida, degree granting institution.
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Bibliography
Text-txt
Academic Theses.
Academic Theses.
Issuance: monographic
Date Created: 2021
Date Issued: 2021.
Publisher: University of West Florida,
Place of Publication: Pensacola, Florida :
Physical Form: electronic resource
Extent: 1 online resource (ix, 78 leaves)
Language(s): eng
Abstract: The researcher investigated whether personality type and learning style predicted performance in distance education. Thirty-four participants from 3 sections of Art Humanities completed online the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and the Learning Styles Inventory. Using regression analysis, it was determined that neither personality type nor learning style had a statistically significant effect on student performance in this setting. However, the data did reveal some apparent self-selection of the learning environment. Sensors outrepresented Intuitives by a large scale, identifying further areas for research. A binomial test was used to prove these results were not random. As some scholars have noted, COVID-19 has exacerbated existing inequities and economic insecurities that increase the risk of harassment. Sexual harassment (SH) involves conduct of a sexual nature that creates an intimidating or hostile work environment or interferes with an individual's job performance. This speculated increase in SH due to COVID-19 could relate to an increase in Stockholm syndrome (SS) among essential workers, as many essential workers may stay at their workplace due to benefits (e.g., finances, healthcare) despite having experienced abuse. As such, the current study applies Stockholm syndrome as a framework to examine the potential relationship between SH and SS, and the effects that various factors (e.g., essential worker status, source of harassment) have on this relationship. One-hundred and twelve participants completed online surveys using Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk). Analyses revealed a positive relationship between SH and SS. Furthermore, essential workers reported higher levels of both SH and SS than their non-essential counterparts. This thesis bridges the gap between SH and domestic violence literature, such that it is the first to apply the SS framework to workplace instances of SH. Future research calls for examining the influence of race and power in influencing this relationship, as well as examining the long-term effects of feelings of SS in the workplace.
Identifier: 1319438744 (oclc), WFE0000798 (IID)
Note(s): by Kenzie Joy Hurley.
Department of Psychology; Usha Kundu MD College of Health
M.A. University of West Florida 2021
Includes bibliographical references.
Also available in print.
Subject(s): University of West Florida
University of West Florida.
Library Classification: LD1807.F62k 2021 H87
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/uwf/fd/WFE0000798
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Host Institution: UWF
Other Format: Stuck in Stockholm. (Print version:)
(OCoLC)1319437696

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